Cosmic-ray isotope measurements with HELIX

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  • <p>ICRC</p>

    ICRC

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  • uploaded June 25, 2021

Discussion timeslot (ZOOM-Meeting): 13. July 2021 - 12:00
ZOOM-Meeting URL: https://desy.zoom.us/j/91896950007
ZOOM-Meeting ID: 91896950007
ZOOM-Meeting Passcode: ICRC2021
Corresponding Session: https://icrc2021-venue.desy.de/channel/15-Future-instrumentation-CRD-MM/67
Live-Stream URL: https://icrc2021-venue.desy.de/livestream/Discussion-06/7

Abstract:
'Recent discoveries of new features in Galactic cosmic-ray fluxes emphasize the importance of understanding the propagation of cosmic rays. HELIX (High Energy Light Isotope eXperiment) is designed to improve the measurements of light cosmic-ray isotopes, including the propagation clock isotope Be-10 and stable secondary isotope Be-9, which will be essential to study the propagation of the cosmic rays. The magnetic spectrometer of HELIX consists of a 1 Tesla superconducting magnet containing a high-resolution gas drift chamber as a tracking detector and two velocity measuring detectors: a time-of-flight detector and a ring-imaging Cherenkov detector. While the HELIX instrument can measure the fluxes of the light isotopes from protons (Z=1) up to neon (Z=10), it is optimized to study the flux of beryllium isotopes from 0.2 GeV/n to beyond 3 GeV/n with a sufficient mass resolution to discriminate between Be-10 and Be-9. In this talk, I will review the scientific goals and the design of the instrument and report its current status and project plans.'

Authors: Nahee Park | for the HELIX Collaboration
Collaboration: HELIX Collaboration

Indico-ID: 1408
Proceeding URL: https://pos.sissa.it/395/091

Tags:
Presenter: Nahee Park

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